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20121208
20121208
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
struggle to avert the fiscal cliff. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. "washington week" can be seen later this evening on most pbs stations. we'll see you online and again here monday evening. have a nice weekend. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made ssible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
. >> that was one of the things i found interesting is washington is so obsessed right now with the fiscal cliff, myself included, and what is happening with the budget showdown, the polling seem to indicate that for most americans of said the beltway, job creation and the state of the economy remains their main concern. what were you going to say? what's i think they go hand in hand. from a business perspective, large corporations are sitting on lots of cash. they are uncertain of what the future will bring. that is the economic future, but the future of tax policy and the rest of that. that is keeping the economy back. if we can reach a deal where we are not coming to blows every six months or one year on what tax policy will look like for another six months, that will give us confidence and will create jobs people want. i am not sure if there is a bifurcation between what washington is focused on and what people want. i think this is about jobs and economic growth. >> i did find one thing surprising. behind retirement programs, social security and medicare, seems to be job creation, deficit r
a discussion on the so- called fiscal cliff negotiations and the impact on unemployment insurance. from "washington journal" this is 40 minutes. host: we continue our look at unemployment insurance and its role in the fiscal clift debate, we are joined by michael tanner and josh bivens. mr. michael tanner, if you had your way in these discussions, where what unemployment insurance end up at the end of the day? guest: i think the emergency extension should fade away and we should go back to the 46 weeks that we have been at, the 26 weeks of traditional employment, and extended benefits in states that have higher unemployment rates. you start with the fact that unemployment insurance itself, when you extended for a long times as questionable value. we know it leads to an increase in the on and -- unemployment rate. that is dubious enough, but when you factor in that we will deficit finance this and slow economic growth overall, destroying jobs of the same time we pay people for being unemployed, a thing that creates a problem. host: how much money do we save if we do not extend emergency
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)